Innocence and Experience

RC Core 100 — First Year Seminar: Innocence and Experience

(Fall 2015 Version)

I.              Course Description

We find images, myths, stories, and symbols of innocence and experience across many centuries, throughout many different civilizations, and in many forms of art and culture. We may associate the terms with childhood, purity, abundance, trial, isolation struggle, labor, freedom, nostalgia, sexuality, knowledge, spontaneity, self-awareness, naivete, wisdom, maturity, and guilt, among other things.

Why are these terms so richly resonant? What do we find so captivating about this pair of terms and the conditions or states they name? How do they relate to one another? If innocence is good, is experience bad? If experience is good, is innocence bad? Can you be innocent and experienced?

What does innocence look and feel like? What are its thoughts, words, and actions? What about experience: what does it look and feel like and what does it think, say, and do?

II.            Course Goals

A.             Familiarize students with critical and literary interpretations of the Judeo-Christian myth of the fall, especially those pertaining to innocence and experience and a related constellation of terms.

B.             Foster awareness and critical reflection upon the psychological, moral, philosophical, and political implications of the myth of the fall.

C.              Develop self-awareness about the meaning and application of the myth of the fall in their own lives and to explore alternative, even contradictory, possible meanings and applications

D.             Exercise and develop the ability to read, comprehend, interpret, reflect critically upon and discuss literary texts, trends, and concepts

E.              Practice and improve their writing skills in a variety of genres of academic writing (as described in the “First-Year Writing Requirement Course Goals” below).

F.              Explore some key texts in the canon of modern Western literature

III.          Course Schedule:

 

Date: What to read, watch, or turn in:
W 9/7 Course Syllabus and Course Concept Map
UNIT 1: IN THE BEGINNING…
M 9/14 1.     Genesis, Chapters 1-4 [CTools and TheBrain]

2.     Kieran Egan, “Mythic Understanding,” from The Educated Mind, pp. 33-70

W 9/16 3.     Elaine Pagels, “The Politics of Paradise” from Adam, Eve, and the Serpent, pp. 98-126 [CTools and TheBrain]

4.     Elaine Pagels “The Nature of Nature” from Adam, Eve, and the Serpent, pp. 127-150 [CTools and TheBrain]

5.     Pagels, “The Social History of Satan” from The Origin of Satan, pp. 35-62 [CTools and TheBrain]

F 9/18 First Draft of Emotional Response Paper Due
M 9/21 1.     Plato, “Allegory of the Cave” from Republic [CTools and TheBrain]

2.     Montaigne, “Of Cannibals,” from Essays, pp. 150-159 [CTools and TheBrain]

UNIT 2: ROMANTICISM REVISITS RELIGION
W 9/23 NO CLASS – Yom Kippur
M 9/28 1.     Kieran Egan, “Romantic Understanding,” from The Educated Mind, pp. 71-104

2.     William Blake, There is no natural religion (1788) [CTools and TheBrain]

Blake, “Proverbs of Hell” from Marriage of Heaven and Hell (1790) [CTools and TheBrain]

1.     William Blake from Songs of Innocence and Experience (1789) [CTools and TheBrain]

1.     Blake, “The Chimney Sweeper,” Songs of Innocence

2.     Blake, “The Chimney Sweeper,” Songs of Experience

3.     Blake, “The Divine Image,” Songs of Innocence

4.     Blake, “The Human Abstract,” Songs of Experience

5.     Blake, “Holy Thursday,” Songs of Innocence

6.     Blake, Holy Thursday,” Songs of Experience

UNIT 3: CHILDHOOD’S END
W 9/30 1.     Billy Collins, “On Turning Ten” [CTools and TheBrain]

2.     Kieran Egan, “Philosophic Understanding” from The Educated Mind, pp. 104-136.

F 10/2 Second Draft of Emotional Response Paper Due
M 10/5 Henry James, The Turn of the Screw (1898)
W 10/7 Henry James, The Turn of the Screw (1898)
M 10/12 William Golding, The Lord of the Flies (1954)
W 10/14 William Golding, The Lord of the Flies (1954)
F 10/16 First Draft of Comparative Paper Due
M 10/19 Fall Break
UNIT 4: CIVILIZATION AND ITS DISCONTENTS
W 10/21 Kieran Egan, “Ironic Understanding,” from The Educated Mind (pp. 137-162)
M 10/26 Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness (1899)
W 10/28 Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness (1899)
F 10/30 Second Draft of Comparative Paper Due
M 11/2 Ralph Waldo Emerson, “The American Scholar” (1837) [CTools and TheBrain]

Langston Hughes, “As I grew older” (1925) [CTools and TheBrain]

Langston Hughes, “Let America be America Again” (1935) [CTools and TheBrain]

W 11/4 Julio Cortázar, “The Southern Thruway” (1964) [CTools and TheBrain]
UNIT 5: EAST OF EDEN
M 11/9 Herman Hesse, Demian (1919)
W 11/11 Herman Hesse, Demian (1919)
F 11/13 First Draft of Analytical Paper Due
M 11/16 Albert Camus, The Fall (1956)
W 11/18 Albert Camus, The Fall (1956)
M 11/23 The Matrix
UNIT 6: ORGANIZED INNOCENCE
W 11/25 Phillip Pullman, The Golden Compass (1995)
M 11/30 Second draft of Analytical Paper Due
M 11/30 Phillip Pullman, The Golden Compass (1995)
W 12/2 Phillip Pullman, The Subtle Knife (1997)
F 12/4 Research paper topic and reference list due
M 12/7 Phillip Pullman, The Subtle Knife (1997)
W 12/9 Research paper outline/rough draft due
W 12/9 Phillip Pullman, The Amber Spyglass (2000)
M 12/14 Phillip Pullman, The Amber Spyglass (2000)
F 12/18 Research paper due

 

IV.            Course Format and Resources

A.             Course format

1.              Discussion.

a)              Our course meets on Mondays and Wednesdays from 2:40 – 4 pm in 1507 East Quad.

b)              The course is organized as a seminar, which means it will be student-centered and discussion driven. My role will be to facilitate discussion and, very occasionally, to supplement discussion with brief lectures. Given this format (and based on my past experience with the course), you will get out of it in enjoyment and growth what you put into it in effort, thought, and openness. To show much I value this, I have allocated 40 % of your overall course grade to elements (Attendance, Participation, and reading response Quotes and Notes) that are conducive to active, genuine discussion.

2.              Writing.

a)              The course fulfills the First Year Writing Requirement (FYWR), which is one of the requirements for graduation from the University of Michigan. The Sweetland Writing Center, which oversees the FYWR, has developed a description and list of the goals of a FYWR course such as ours:

(1)             Produce complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts.

(2)             Read, summarize, analyze, and synthesize complex texts purposefully in order to generate and support writing.

(3)             Demonstrate an awareness of the strategies that writers use in different rhetorical situations.

(4)             Develop flexible strategies for organizing, revising, editing, and proofreading writing of varying lengths to improve development of ideas and appropriateness of expression.

(5)             Collaborate with peers and the instructor to define revision strategies for particular pieces of writing, to set goals for improving writing, and to devise effective plans for achieving those goals.

b)              I’ve designed writing assignments with these goals in mind. But I’ve tried to balance them with frameworks and specific topics that I believe will deepen your engagement with the materials, augment your self-awareness, empower you as writers, and enhance your enjoyment of the seminar.

B.             Course Materials and Resources

(1)             Kieran Egan, The Educated Mind: How Cognitive Tools Shape our Understanding (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998) ISBN: 9780226190396

(2)             Henry James, Turn of the Screw (New York: Norton, 1990) ISBN: 9780393959048

(3)             William Golding, Lord of the Flies (New York: Perigree, 1954) ISBN: 9780399501487

(4)             Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness (New York: Penguin, 1994), ISBN: 9780140620481

(5)             Herman Hesse, Demian (New York: Viking, 2013) ISBN: 9780143106784

(6)             Albert Camus, The Fall (New York: Vintage, 1991) ISBN: 9780679720225

(7)             Phillip Pullman, The Golden Compass (New York: Yearling, 2007) ISBN: 9780440418320

(8)             Phillip Pullman, The Subtle Knife (New York: Yearling, 2001) ISBN: 9780440418337

(9)             Phillip Pullman, The Amber Spyglass (New York; Yearling, 2007) ISBN: 9780440418566

(10)          In addition, we will be watching the film The Matrix (directed by Andy and Lana Wachowski, 1999). You will be responsible for acquiring access to this film on your own. It is available for $2.99 on Google Play, Amazon, and YouTube. It is also available in the Askwith Media Library (Room 2002 Shapiro Undergraduate Library).

V.             Course Requirements and Grading

A.             Attendance (10 % of overall course grade)

The stuff most important to your learning will be done in class: watching, reading, thinking, talking and listening together with your classmates and me.

1.              Attendance means showing up for every class, in accordance with the University of Michigan Student Class Attendance Policy.

2.              How will attendance be graded?

a)              If you come to discussion section you get full credit (i.e. “100”) for that day’s “Attendance” grade.

b)              If you miss class for one of the reasons described in the University’s attendance policy, you must provide documentation and you are still responsible for all viewing and reading assignments…

c)               If you miss class and are unable to provide documentation you get no credit (i.e. “0”) for that day’s “Attendance” Grade’”

B.             Attention

Can you learn anything if you are not paying attention? Really? Well, actually you’re wrong: many studies have demonstrated that you can’t. But so what, right? If you aren’t learning anything, that’s your business, right? Well, no, wrong again: many studies have also shown that in group settings one person’s failure to pay attention affects the learning capacities of others.

1.              Attention means:

a)              Your cell phone is turned off and put away when you get into class. If this becomes a problem we will collect them at the beginning of class and return them at the end.

b)              You are only using electronic devices like laptops, tablets, or readers for class purposes. All other applications are closed and the device itself is closed and put away when you are not viewing assigned materials.

c)               You are quiet when others are speaking and you are actively listening with your full attention and respect and with an open mind to whoever is speaking.

2.              Attention will be graded as part of your participation grade as explained below.

C.              Participation (15 % of overall course grade)

The heart of this class will be conversations, and what you get out of them will depend in part on what you put into them and in part on what your classmates put into them. Because you have prepared for class and paid attention and have a heart and a brain you will always have feelings, opinions and thoughts. Participation means having the courage—regardless of whatever insecurities you have—and the respect for yourself, those who have helped you get to college, your classmates, and me to share honestly and thoughtfully the feelings, opinions and thoughts that you’ve had as you prepared for class or in the course of a class meeting.

1.              You’ll get a participation score from 0-100 for every day that your section meets (as follows).

2.              You get a “0” if you weren’t in class and did not follow the University’s student attendance policy (see section “V. A. Attendance” above).

3.              You get a “60” if you were in class, but you didn’t participate or appear engaged or prepared. Maybe you slept, texted, used your computer without permission. You were there, sure, but you actively disengaged from discussion.

4.              You get a “70” if you were in class, but didn’t participate constructively or appear engaged. Maybe you stayed awake and off your devices, but you were eating in class without permission (beverages are okay) or frequently talking or joking with friends.

5.              You get an “85” if you were in class and, though you didn’t participate constructively, you did appear engaged. You may have stayed silent. Or, if you did speak, it appeared that you were just speaking to make sure your instructor knew you were there.

6.              You get a “100” if you were in class, appeared engaged, participated constructively and added to our discussion with sincere intention and purpose.

D.             Reading and Watching

I’ve put a lot of thought into identifying course materials and I’ve spent a lot of time gathering them and rendering them available to you. That’s okay, because that’s my job and because I enjoy it. Your job is to put just as much time into reading or watching these assigned materials and just as much thought into considering their significance and impact and into preparing yourself to discuss them with classmates. Think of your engagement with these materials as an opportunity to widen our conversation to include some really smart and interesting people on subjects that impact your lives. Who wouldn’t want that? And who wouldn’t pay full attention in that conversation?

1.              A chronologically ordered list of required reading and viewing appears in section “VII. Course Schedule” below as well as on the course concept map.

2.              You are to read and/or watch all required assignments by the time we meet in class on the date they appear on the Course Schedule.

3.              Other than books I’ve asked you to buy or check out of the library, you can find all required reading and viewing materials in two places:

a)              On course CTools site: go to “Resources,” open the folder with the appropriate date, and open the folder in that called “Assigned Readings.” Inside you’ll find files and links.

b)              On the course concept map at TheBrain: activate the “Schedule” thought, then activate the thought for the date in question, then activate the “Required Resources” thought for that date. You’ll find each of the required assignments linked there and each will be accompanied by some brief notes to help you orient yourself.

4.              As you read or watch, I recommend taking notes. Even if you only jot down or underline or somehow flag or bookmark passages or images that especially impacted you, that will help you enormously with your in class participation as well as in composing your Quotes and Notes and even in conceiving and completing your papers.

E.              Quotes and Notes (15 % of overall course grade)

“Quotes and Notes” is the name I gave to a journaling assignment for the course. At a most basic level, they are way of making sure you are putting in the minimal effort of looking at the required materials.

But they also serve other purposes. They will encourage you to spend a bit of time both collecting and articulating your feelings and thoughts about the assigned materials.

Because you have to share them with the class on CTools, you’ll likely put at least a bit of effort into clarifying them for yourself and your classmates. And so, you will all also have a chance to see what classmates are thinking, which may in turn clarify your own thinking or spark new lines of thought.

They can serve as points of departure, inspirations or even basic raw materials for your other writing assignments.

Here’s how they work:

1.              Quotes and Notes (Due by 9 pm every Sunday or Tuesday night that precedes discussion of a new assignment)

a)              Do the assigned reading or viewing and take notes as you do so.

b)              Select a quotation from the assigned reading or viewing that impacted you especially strongly: it could be something that moved you, that you had never thought of, that you thought was put especially well, that you disagreed or agreed with, that angered or upset you.

c)               Briefly tell why you selected the quote you chose and describe its impact on you. I don’t care about how polished or long your note is. I do care that you do it and that you do it with total honesty and candor.

d)              Post your quote and note with your name as a “New Conversation” within the appropriate “Topic” in the “Forums” section of the CTools website.

e)              Read your classmates’ quotes and notes.

f)               Grading scale:

(1)             Posted by Sunday or Tuesday night at 9 pm (100)

(2)             Post between Sunday or Tuesday, 9 pm and Monday or Wednesday 2:30 pm (75)

(3)             Posted after that or not at all (50)

F.              Emotional Response Essay (Due Friday, 9/18; 15 %)

1.              The task. Briefly summarize your emotional response to Genesis and then, using a personal narrative, explain that response, making references to the text that show its connection to your narrative.

2.              The basics.

a)              No less than 3 typed, double-spaced pages.

b)              Submit as attachment in the course CTools site “Assignments” list.

c)               First draft due: Friday, September 18 by 11:55 pm (5 %).

d)              Second, revised draft due: Friday, October 2 by 11:55 pm (10 %).

3.              What is a response essay? A response essay can take many different directions, but remember that part of the point of the paper is to help those who read it understand the connections you have made and the feelings that arose for you. Why did this particular poem, short story, play, or essay evoke a sad memory or recall a triumph? What details affected you strongly? You need to show your audience exactly what you felt as you were reading the work. Avoid simply announcing that you liked or didn’t like what you read. Showing means finding examples that will make sense to your readers. For this reason, you should reread the work or key passages carefully several times to find telling examples. To write a strong response paper, you need to make clear and frequent references to the work that evoked the thoughts and feelings you’ll be discussing.

4.              Response Essay Checklist

a)              Read the work or key passages from it several times, making marginal notes and writing journal entries to explore your responses.

b)              Focus on one response that seems particularly strong

c)               Explain that response, using examples from your own experience, but also make certain to refer to the work so that the connections between your experience and the work are clear.

d)              Make sure the structure serves, and evolves along with, your argument. No single structure works for every argument.

5.              Grading policy.

a)              Graded on a 100 point scale.

b)              Late submissions accepted with prior consent, but maximum grade drops 10 points for every day late.

c)               Criteria:

(1)             Polish (have you cleaned up typos, and checked for spelling and grammatical errors?).

(2)             Clarity and Coherence (are your sentences complete and clear? Is each paragraph unified around a main point? Do all the sentences in each paragraph relate to that point? Are the transitions between paragraphs logical and easy to follow?)

(3)             Persuasiveness (do the steps in your argument follow logically from on another? If relevant, have you supported your statements with evidence from appropriate sources?)

(4)             Originality (have you addressed a unique issue? Or taken a unique point of view on a common topic? Have you expressed yourself in your own voice? Have you been open and honest?)

G.             Comparative Essay (Due Friday, 10/16; 15 %)

1.              The task. Explore the similarities and differences you see between Genesis and two other texts you read (you must choose one text each from Unit 2 and one from Unit 3). Then write a paper explaining what you discovered and what significance you find in these similarities and differences.

2.              The basics.

a)              No less than 5 typed, double-spaced pages

b)              Submit as attachment in the course CTools site “Assignments” list.

c)               First draft due Friday, October 16 by 11:55 pm (5 %).

d)              Second, revised draft due Friday, October 30 by 11:55 pm (10 %)

3.              What is a comparative essay? A comparative essay can also take many different directions, but the main purpose is to help those who read it understand the relationship between two or more different works. Subject, style, setting, plot, character, themes, ideas, metaphors, and symbols are among the elements of works that might be compared in your paper. You should first demonstrate that the objects of your comparison are comparable. But you must also try to persuade your reader of the significance and value of the comparison you have drawn. For this reason, and given the length of this assignment, it may be better to focus on a smaller number of similarities or differences.

4.              Comparative Essay Checklist

a)              As you plan the paper by doing preliminary reading, writing, and thinking, use lists and outlines to organize your ideas.

b)              Remember that a comparison should be made for a purpose. A comparison should not simply list the similarities and differences discovered during your reading.

c)               Note which similarities or differences seem most significant or compelling and decide which you will emphasize.

d)              Decide how you will organize your paper – for example “whole work – individual subject” approach, the “point-by-point” approach, or a combination of these approaches.

5.              Grading Policy.

a)              Graded on a 100 point scale.

b)              Late submissions accepted with prior consent, but maximum grade drops 10 points for every day late.

c)               Criteria:

(1)             Polish (have you cleaned up typos, and checked for spelling and grammatical errors?).

(2)             Clarity and Coherence (are your sentences complete and clear? Is each paragraph unified around a main point? Do all the sentences in each paragraph relate to that point? Are the transitions between paragraphs logical and easy to follow?)

(3)             Persuasiveness (do the steps in your argument follow logically from on another? If relevant, have you supported your statements with evidence from appropriate sources?)

(4)             Originality (have you addressed a unique issue? Or taken a unique point of view on a common topic? Have you expressed yourself in your own voice? Have you been open and honest?)

H.             Analytical Essay (Due Friday, 11/13; 15 %)

1.              The task. Consider what you believe to be the values and beliefs suggested by the texts you’ve read thus far. Choose one of these texts and explain those values and beliefs as well as your evaluation of them. Are there different, conflicting values and beliefs? Does the text appear to “side” with one set more than another? How does the style of writing affect your sense of this? Do you agree with them completely? Question them? Explain.

2.              The basics.

a)              No less than 5 typed, double-spaced pages.

b)              Submit as attachment in the course CTools site “Assignments” list.

c)               First draft due Friday, November 13 by 11:55 pm (5 %).

d)              Second, revised draft due Monday, November 30 by 11:55 pm (10 %)

3.              What is an analytical essay? A literary work can be judged in many ways. For instance, a reader may evaluate a work by asking questions such as “Is this poem beautiful?”, “Are the motives of the characters convincing?”, or “What are the values supported by this work and do I subscribe to those values?” In this particular assignment you are to focus on and consider the values or beliefs supported by a particular work and to evaluate these for yourself. Whenever we judge, we rely upon some sort of criteria or standard. Each of you must develop your own standards for evaluation, but these criteria will come from what you have experienced, observed, and heard, whether at home, in school, among friends, in religious institutions, or elsewhere. It is important in this paper not only to be convincing that the text does indeed support (at least in part) the values or beliefs you attribute to it, but also that you explicitly identify the criteria you are using in evaluating the beliefs. Be open to the possibility that in the process of reading and writing this paper your criteria (and so you judgment) may change or be suspended entirely

4.              Analytical Essay Checklist

a)              Identify the beliefs and values expressed in the work, making note of specific details that demonstrate these beliefs and values.

b)              Think about the criteria you will use to evaluate those beliefs and values.

c)               Consider what questions might be raised concerning those beliefs and values. (If you share values with the text, imagine the response of someone who does not.)

d)              To expand your thinking, consider interviewing others who might be particularly interested in the values and beliefs expressed in the work.

e)              Decide whether your evaluation will support or question or both the values and beliefs expressed in the work.

f)               List your reasons for supporting and questioning those values and beliefs. Be explicit. Spell it out.

g)              Remember to reread the text or key passages frequently to make certain you are responding to values and beliefs actually expressed there.

h)              Make certain the opening section of the paper makes clear both the values and beliefs expressed in the work and the approach or approaches you are taking toward those values and beliefs.

i)                Make sure the structure serves, and evolves along with, your argument. No single structure works for every argument.

j)                Make certain the conclusion sums up the evaluation – the reason you support and subscribe to (and/or do not support and subscribe to) the beliefs and values expressed in the work.

5.              Grading Policy.

a)              Graded on a 100 point scale.

b)              Late submissions accepted with prior consent, but maximum grade drops 10 points for every day late.

c)               Criteria:

(1)             Polish (have you cleaned up typos, and checked for spelling and grammatical errors?).

(2)             Clarity and Coherence (are your sentences complete and clear? Is each paragraph unified around a main point? Do all the sentences in each paragraph relate to that point? Are the transitions between paragraphs logical and easy to follow?)

(3)             Persuasiveness (do the steps in your argument follow logically from on another? If relevant, have you supported your statements with evidence from appropriate sources?)

(4)             Originality (have you addressed a unique issue? Or taken a unique point of view on a common topic? Have you expressed yourself in your own voice? Have you been open and honest?)

I.               Research Story (Due Friday, December 18th;10 %)

1.              The task. Discover a question provoked by a passage, theme, or image you’ve encountered in one (or possibly more, but no more than three) of the texts you have read this semester. Do research to explore that question. In your paper, refer to at least three sources. At least one of the sources you cite must originally have been published in print form, offline (though you may cite the internet version). As one of your reference sources you may use Egan’s The Educated Mind or either of Elaine Pagels works. In other words, two of your reference sources must be discovered outside of class

2.              The basics.

a)              No less than 7 typed, double-spaced pages.

b)              Submit all components as attachments in the course CTools site “Assignments” list.

c)               Topic and preliminary reference list due Friday, December 4 by 11:55 pm (5 %)

d)              Outline or rough draft due Friday, December 11 by 11:55 pm (5 %).

e)              Final revised draft due Friday, December 18 by 11:55 pm (5 %)

3.              What is a research story?

a)              At the heart of everything we do in a university is a commitment to the individual and collective important of expanding our knowledge and understanding of ourselves, each other, and the world through open inquiry and the free exchange of ideas.

b)              What drives our ability to fulfill that promise is curiosity. Curiosity begins with a humbly acknowledged experience of wonder and uncertainty and then takes the form of questions. Remember the incredible ability to generate questions that you had as a child: why is the sky blue? Where do we come from? How many stars are there? Will I still be me when I’m big? It’s the same force at work in what we do in the university.

c)               Furthermore, we can think of questions as sparking quests, like heroic quests, in which we travel out from the familiar ground of what we have always known and journey, encountering obstacles and aids in the course of our adventure. We may or may not get to our destination in the sense of a final, definitive answer to our question, but we surely will have acquired valuable experience, learned a great deal, and have some stories to share.

4.              Research Story Checklist

a)              Think of the texts we have read, review your reading journals and marginal notes, the notes you took during lecture and discussion, perhaps even your previous papers and try to make a list of questions that outside reading might help you answer.

b)              Become familiar with library resources (books, specialized dictionaries and encyclopedias, Humanities Index, MLA International Bibliography, newspaper indexes)

c)               Skim the sources you discover to find which might help you to answer or to focus or reformulate your questions.

d)              Decide on a preliminary thesis.

e)              Take notes from sources that will help you to explore this thesis.

f)               Organize your information and begin to draft.

g)              Make sure the structure serves, and evolves along with, your argument. No single structure works for every argument.

h)              Remember to use quotations and paraphrases sparingly. Your ideas, not those of your sources, should dominate the paper.

i)                Lead in to quotations and paraphrases smoothly, so that the reader knows why they are important.

j)                Provide accurate documentation for quoted and paraphrased material and provide an accurate list of works cited.

k)              But remember: It’s an adventure, like many you’ve already undertaken in your life in and out of school. So draw upon what you know about how to have adventures:

(1)             use your imagination

(2)             be resourceful

(3)             be smart

(4)             be brave

(5)             have fun.

5.              Grading Policy.

a)              Graded on a 100 point scale.

b)              Late submissions accepted with prior consent, but maximum grade drops 10 points for every day late.

c)               Criteria:

(1)             Polish (have you cleaned up typos, and checked for spelling and grammatical errors?).

(2)             Clarity and Coherence (are your sentences complete and clear? Is each paragraph unified around a main point? Do all the sentences in each paragraph relate to that point? Are the transitions between paragraphs logical and easy to follow?)

(3)             Persuasiveness (do the steps in your argument follow logically from on another? If relevant, have you supported your statements with evidence from appropriate sources?)

(4)             Originality (have you addressed a unique issue? Or taken a unique point of view on a common topic? Have you expressed yourself in your own voice? Have you been open and honest?)

J.               Grading Scale

1.              A               92% and above

2.              A-              90-91%

3.              B+             87-89%

4.              B               83-86%

5.              B-              80-82%

6.              C+             77-79%

7.              C               73-76%

8.              C-              70-72%

9.              D+            67-69%

10.           D               63-66%

11.           D-             60-62%

12.           E                50-59%

13.           F                49% and below

VI.            Academic Integrity

A.             I expect this not to be an issue. But I want to emphasize that in an intellectual community like a university, plagiarism is a form of stealing. If you are in doubt as to whether or not you should cite a source for a quotation or idea you are including your written work, my suggestion is that you cite the reference. You will never be penalized for “over-citation.”

B.             If you are caught plagiarizing, you will be asked to meet with me to discuss the issue and to determine what consequences and further procedures may be required. For more on plagiarism, please consult the following website which contains links to excellent explanations of plagiarism and why it is so harmful to a university community as well as tips to help you avoid it: http://www.lib.umich.edu/shapiro-undergraduate-library/understanding-plagiarism-and-academic-integrity

 

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